Coach Gets In The Game

I was able to co-teach today.  Sometimes the hardest part about being a literacy coach is being out of the classroom. I miss the students. I miss the relationships. I miss having little people, besides ones I gave birth to of course, excited to see me each day.  I miss working on activities that I know will allow a certain child to flourish.  I miss the classroom.  But today, today I got to co-teach.

I have been working with a novice teacher on a coaching cycle of more engaging activities and student led discussions.  The lesson for the today was grammar based.  We had a co-planning session on how to make quotation marks exciting. After planning, the teacher decided to teach quotation marks by showing students how these pesky punctuations are important in dialogue.

1) We began by having a learning intention discussion on quotation marks and dialogue.  With the preplanned questions the teacher was able to facilitate this student led discussion easily. Student’s shared their understanding of dialogue, quotation marks, and their uses in wScreen Shot 2015-03-24 at 11.55.07 AMriting.

2) We gave each student a worksheet that was divided into two columns.  One side had an excerpt from “The Lottery” with quotation marks (QM) and the other the same excerpt without QM.  The students folded the paper in half (hot dog style) in order to only read one column at a time highlighting what they thought was dialogue.  Discussion after led students to ah-ha moments of how much easier it is to read with QM.

3) We then reviewed QM with the students using a Nearpod  where they were able to interact with several Draw It slides.  Students understood how to place QM in dialogue and where they go in relation to the punctuation.

Overall, the lesson on QM was engaging and allowed for student led discussions. After the lesson the teacher and I had time to reflect.  She discussed what she liked about the lesson and what she wanted to tweak before the next block.  I really enjoyed this coaching cycle, mostly because I was back in the classroom.  Hope to do it again soon!


proxyDuring the month of March 2015, I will be completing a daily blog as part of the Slice of Life Story Challenge! More Slice of Life posts from Day 24 can be found on Two Writing Teachers.

READ & JOIN US! You can sign up here!

6 thoughts on “Coach Gets In The Game

  1. I think that this was the hardest part of being an instructional coach. But both Cara and I made a point to engage at least two long-term coaching cycles with teachers at a time. As part of these long-term coaching cycles, we embedded ourselves into classrooms every day for 4-6 weeks (in middle school we negotiated with the teacher for one class period that made sense for the work we were doing). We felt like having two cycles going at a time allowed us into classrooms to get a kid recharge and also gave us time to do the eleventy-billion other things that instructional coaches are called to do. Overall, it was the BEST part of our jobs and where we saw the most student and teacher growth. Keep it up!

    Like

  2. Your writing is so clear and easy to understand Misty. Thank you for sharing this amazing lesson with us as well as your personal experience! I just adore the handout you gave to students and think it was such an authentic and meaningful process you took them through.
    -Dana

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I love this idea–can I borrow it for my classroom? I think the activity with the excerpt from “The Lottery” could be adapted well to discuss commas too, which my 9th graders struggle with consistently. What a lucky teacher to have a coach like you guiding and assisting her development.

    Liked by 1 person

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